Feminine Creative Potential and the Magdalene Heart

Water and money share currency, and the ability to source abundance from the feminine, sourced from within, is a topic that spirit-rich women business leaders may consider deeply. The feminine archetype represented by Mary Magdalene is associated with the sex and money dynamic of the second chakra, comprising a part of women’s identity and relationship to money. 

In ancient Sumeria, a Priestess holds an urn, waist high, from which she pours the living water of Source. Where there is water, there is the currency of deep emotion and of love. The vessel she holds is symbolic of womb and vagina, and of the mythic feminine principal of Creation. Centuries pass. Another woman follows in the footsteps of the first and picks up the urn, assuming the ancient feminine identity associated with the struggle between good and evil. Her name is Mary Magdalene, and it is the symbolism associated with her person on which we now focus.

bourbonnais-magdalen15c

A 15th c. Bourbonnaise statue bears a striking resemblance to the Magdalene statuette in the private collection of the author.

This inquiry began when, recently, a vintage chalk statue of Mary Magdalene found its way to me. At first, I wasn’t certain who was depicted in the simple form in modest attire, with downcast eyes, and a lidded jar. At once human and saint, and despite a “garbled Biblical account of a female follower of Christ,” the story “conceals a woman of immense importance,” according to Witcombe’s “The Shifting Identity of Mary Magdalene in the Renaissance,” a 1993 scholarly paper presented at a 16th century studies conference. To many, she is at once human and saint, priestess and goddess.

The urn, traditionally an ointment jar, may be depicted with the lid either closed or ajar. “Taking the lid off” is a particularly potent symbol-action, according to Witcombe. The equivalent in mythology is the opening a Pandora’s box of sexuality and feminine power in which the source of life is also the source of evil. This depiction is shared with ancient Goddess images of Isis, who hold a skull in one hand with a snake wrapped around their arm, and the telltale ointment jar in the other.

Certain of the Essene Gospels remark upon Mary Magdalene’s use of spikenard ointment in ritual and ceremony; there are more of these verses than the oft-cited Alabaster Jar anointing of Yeshua, and these bear closer scrutiny. In these, it is the Magdalene heart which emerges.

In Magdalene’s identity, women may choose to consider the import of the one who has travelled the singular path of the divine feminine – even when doing so seems counter to the society of the day. Should we choose to pick up the vessel in turn, we might ask:

  • What does it mean today to be a vessel for the energy of Source through our symbol-actions in the world?
  • What of our relationship with our bodies as indwelling temple spaces?
  • How does it feel to explore our sexuality or Creation power and its connection to money and abundant resources?
  • What do Magdalene and Yeshua model for us regarding conscious equal partnership with our beloveds, both within our hearts and in our relationships with our partners?

How do these influences positively or negatively impact our creation potential or ability to increase currency in the forms of energy or money in business and life?

Sherri L. McLendon is a conscious business coach, marketing public relations consultant, and content strategist with Professional Moneta International, http://www.womenspiritandmoney.biz.

 

 

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